Quick Answer: Is Someone’S Possessive?

Is someone else’s grammatically correct?

In any event else’s is perfectly fine.

Dictionary.com’s entry for else says, “other or in addition (used in the possessive following an indefinite pronoun): someone else’s money.” There is nothing wrong with “someone else’s”..

What does it mean to be in someone’s life?

—used to designate something as the greatest moment or event of its kind in someone’s lifeThis is the financial opportunity of his life.

What is a singular possessive?

Notyouraveragedummy. . The singular possessive case is a singular noun or pronoun (a word for one person or thing) that indicates something belongs to that person or thing.

What is a possessive phrase example?

Possessive pronouns include my, mine, our, ours, its, his, her, hers, their, theirs, your and yours. These are all words that demonstrate ownership. If the book belongs to me, then it is mine. If the book belongs to her, then it is hers.

Do you use an apostrophe for ownership?

An apostrophe is normally used with the letter s to show ownership or possession. With most singular nouns, simply add an apostrophe plus the letter s to do this. An apostrophe plus s is never added to make a noun plural–even a proper noun. … (Not possessive; use no apostrophe to make a noun plural.)

What is the possessive form of someone?

Add an apostrophe and an –s to form the possessive of the pronouns anyone, anybody, everyone, everybody, someone, somebody, no one, and nobody.

Is there an apostrophe in someone’s?

Rule 1: For singular nouns, indefinite pronouns (e.g. anybody, someone, nobody) and words already ending in s, place the apostrophe before the s when indicating ownership. Rule 2: For plural nouns ending in s, place the apostrophe after the s when indicating ownership.

What is a possessive phrase?

The possessive form is used with nouns referring to people, groups of people, countries, and animals. It shows a relationship of belonging between one thing and another. To form the possessive, add apostrophe + s to the noun. If the noun is plural, or already ends in s, just add an apostrophe after the s.

Where does the apostrophe go in peoples?

If you are speaking about a group of people, large or small, you put the apostrophe after “people.” You put the apostrophe after the possessor, which in this case is “people.” So the sentence is: I correct other people’s grammar mistakes.

How do you show possession with a name that ends in s?

The general rule is that the possessive of a singular noun is formed by adding an apostrophe and s, whether the singular noun ends in s or not. The possessive of a plural noun is formed by adding only an apostrophe when the noun ends in s, and by adding both an apostrophe and s when it ends in a letter other than s.

Is it someone’s or someones?

1 Answer. English speakers use the possessive apostrophe (“someone’s something”) where possible, because it makes sentences more clear to specify a direct object without it also being the object of a prepositional phrase, and it makes nested ownership more clear.